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Yes Waves of Renewable Energy

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(Photograph: John Lamparski/Getty Images)

For anyone who participated in the 400,000 strong #PeoplesClimateMarch on Autumn Equinox September 21, 2014, the euphoria of change came in waves of sound. Yes waves, chants for change. It was a day like no other in New York City, with almost double the number of expected participants sending a photo-friendly message to the world about climate change readiness. The level of good will and positivity in the crowd resonated throughout the entire city. We marched for a total of five hours.
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Meanwhile, around the world thousands of marches coincided, with citizen journalists uploading their videos and photographs in real time, contributing the the indisputable euphoria of the collective effort for change. Due to the efforts of many organizations like 350.org, Sierra Club, Friends of the Earth, World Wildlife Fund, and key celebrities like Mark Ruffalo, Yoko Ono and many others collaborating tirelessly for years on targeted messaging across multiple platforms using hashtags like #fossilfree and #NoKeystoneXL, a Global Climate Movement has come of age. And wild weather swings like Hurricane Sandy, the California drought, forest fires in Colorado have been part of the American wake-up call.

Since the march, President Obama has vetoed the Keystone XL pipeline; universities, foundations and businesses across the country have committed to divest their holdings from fossil fuel investments; New York’s Governor Cuomo has banned fracking; and solar and wind power gains have begun to disrupt the fossil fuel industry’s hold on the narrative about power. To coincide with the United Nations Climate Summit The People’s Climate March this Fall, the venerable Rockefeller Foundation announced plans to divest their $860 million philanthropic organization holdings from oil, gas and coal investments. Their huge influence is part of the tipping point.
People's Climate March

One element of the success of the renewable energy movement has been the rising sophistication of websites like that of 350.org, which provides educational resources, opportunities for community building via mapping, event and media-sharing, as well as downloadable posters, videos and creative how-tos. And creative mapping projects like The Wind Map are helping people visualize the power of natural resources.


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Innovations in renewable energy have come from unexpected corners in the Midwest, like this past summer’s highly successful IndieGoGo campaign for Solar Roadways, which hinged in large part on a hilarious video, viewed over 19 million times on YouTube:

We received donations from 165 countries, which is a clear indication that the world is ready for the paradigm shift Solar Roadways will become. We can’t tell you what that level of support and encouragement has meant to us.

 

Despite the enormous tax breaks and loopholes which continue to benefit the oil industries, and the monied influence of billionaires like the Koch brothers, alternative energy is finally seeing worldwide growth.

The amount of solar installed globally per year surged by almost sixfold between 2009 and 2014, with China leading the way last year, followed by the United States and Japan.–The New York Times

What are your thoughts on the renewable energy movement? Do you think we have finally reached the tipping point for innovation? Did you attend the People’s Climate March? What was your experience of it, virtual or otherwise?




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  1. Peta Mni

    Great article! I felt discouraged about humanity’s progress regarding renewable energy and climate change until I came across videos documenting the arcology project of Masdar City, based in the United Arab Emirate just outside Abu Dhabi. The city is designed to run fully on renewable energies including fully automated transportation systems. The funding for the insanely expensive experiment comes from oil profits, which makes sense considering who on earth has the necessary funds to do as much. Initially costs were around $20B. Learning about such a project happening now and at that scale was reassuring. If those who are making the most money on oil see renewables as the future then there’s hope. Still I think the status quo will continue until every last drop of profit is eked out of coal, oil and gas. But I hope that Pope Francis’ stance this year towards environmental protection as a moral issue to arouse support from the 1B Catholics worldwide, combined with his UN appearance in September and work towards an inter-faith movement on this issue, will have a significant impact. This along with successes like bans on fracking etc have prevented me from being consumed by despair.

  2. R.Stauffer

    While I (unfortunately) didn’t get to attend the People’s Climate March, I did follow it vigorously online, and I have to say, it was one of the most explosive (in a good way), active displays of live reporting, citizen journalists, and community activism I’ve ever seen. I was awed by how overwhelmingly positive the response, even on social media, was…so it was interesting to hear that energy was even more prominent in person.

    Honestly, I do think we’ve reached a pivotal point in the renewable energy movement, and the eco-friendly movement, in general. While I certainly think there’s more we can do, I’ve noticed recently that more people (and brands) seem to be paying attention to preserving our world. Recently, at Target, I noticed a line of recycled paper plates, plastic cups, etc. Not only were these goods made using recycled materials, but for every product purchased, the company donated one meal to a person in need through the Feeding America Program. I don’t think we would’ve seen something like that in a mainstream chain store even five years ago.

    What I’ve found most fascinating is the role social media has played. I was thinking of the Solar Roadways YouTube video before I even saw it mentioned in the article, which seems to be a small example of how dominant the social media presence has been. One thing that’s interesting is the idea of using something utterly modern (social networking) to save something historic (our planet). Would the movements that promote renewable energy and “going green” be going at all without social media?

  3. Rachel Weidinger

    The amount of growing influence of renewable energy resources and social media has been incredibly positive over the years. Awareness and activism about the issue has increased with flying colors, so to speak. I think there are several factors to tribute to this influence including the medium, channels, perceptions, environment, and target groups. The blend of these elements is crucial in strengthening initiatives to fight for specific environmental issues. The US has come very far in terms of time and the level of innovation. I think that there can always be improvements to an issue, and that we are never truly at the tipping point for innovation. Environmental conditions are constantly changing, so the focus has to be on adapting to these changes instead of focusing on the end goal.

    Right now I think that the US is in a strong state of advocacy on the social change timeline. There have been many strong issues and events listed above that have worked to bring awareness and encourage participation. A big factor within this influence is social media. Many of the hashtags for these movements are associated with certain hashtags, in which people actively search to become familiar with the status of the issue. I did not participate in the People’s Climate March, but felt as though I had a very thorough knowledge of the March via Twitter. I remember searching through tweets, photographs, and articles regarding the March and seeing several different perspectives. I think it’s incredibly important to be aware of the different issues and sides that people are taking to factor in your response. If we keep this up, I think we will continue to see positive effects and hopefully soon, even more dynamic changes to the environmental issues today.

  4. Adrienne S

    I was, unfortunately, unable to attend the People’s Climate March, but I monitored the progress on social media platforms. I don’t believe that I am the most well-versed in terms of climate change or renewable energy resources, but I am interested in the topic. All too often, I have been lectured about how my generation will be left with nothing because the current generation is using up all of the earth’s natural resources. The renewable energy movement seems to be a great solution to this problem. I remember that the intitial reactions to the solar powered roads were very optimistic. I must have seen it posted on my Tumblr dashboard at least one hundred times when it first aired. The responses were so full of energy and overwhelming support. Many asked why this wasn’t being funded by the government and why they couldn’t have it right then and there, excited for the new development, rather than skeptic of it. I remain optimistic, but also agree completetly with Rachel when she says that we have to ” be aware of the different issues and sides that people are taking to factor in your response”. I’m motivated to correct myself and be more educated in the future about this topic.

  5. Roderic David

    I did not attend the People’s Climate March but I did follow it very closely. I was very impressed by the turnout, and think as the article hints at many of the above have discussed, this could signal a tipping point in the renewable energy movement.

    Shortly after the march, I recall reading an article in The New Yorker, which addressed how successful the protest was and wage future impact it would have. It stated very clearly that we as individuals, probably could do very little to affect climate change, rather it must begin with the major corporations. The turnout at the climate march signals to them that people are very serious about this issue and sure enough, policies changed shortly thereafter.

    I think that in order to continue to move forward with renewable energy, we must continue to be vocal about the changes we want to see, whether that be through social media campaigns or voting with our dollars. As the article stated, recent weather phenomena and other changes have captured everyone’s attention on climate change. While we have it, we have to keep working so that corporations and legislators will take notice too.

  6. bill ritter

    before the social media we know today was birthed, celebrities represented a kind of social media when it came to activism. and the environment has always been a front and center issue for them.
    I think go Woody Guthrie’s “This Land is My Land” because, really, wasn’t that an environmentalist tome? “This land is my land, this land is your land, from California to the New York Island. From the redwood forests, to the gulf stream waters, this land was made for you and me.” It was written in 1940, but not released until 1951.
    Later, entertainers who would become involved in the civil rights, anti-war, and women’s rights movements, also became involved in the environmentalist movement. Earth Day was one focus. Anti-nuclear protests were another, culminating in what was one of the most powerful environmentalist concerts ever – “No Nukes” in Sept. 1979 in New York City. It became an album and a movie.
    Here’s a link to some of the songs:
    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=no+nukes

    One of the anthems of that concert and the movement was “Power” by John Hall (later elected a Congressman from New York), with some powerful lyrics heralding the “warm power of the sun.”
    here are the lyrics:

    Just give me the warm power of the sun
    Give me the steady flow of a waterfall
    Give me the spirit of living things as they return to clay

    Just give me the restless power of the wind
    Give me the comforting glow of a wood fire
    But please take all of your atomic poison power away

    Everybody needs some power I’m told
    To shield them from the darkness and the cold
    Some may see a way to take control
    When it’s bought and sold

    I know that lives are at stake
    Yours and mine and our descendants in time
    There’s so much to gain, so much to lose
    Everyone of us has to choose

    Just give me the warm power of the sun
    Give me the steady flow of a waterfall
    Give me the spirit of living things as they return to clay

    Just give me the restless power of the wind
    Give me the comforting glow of a wood fire
    But please take all of your atomic poison power away

    here are peter paul and mary performing “power” in 1986 as part of PPM’s 25th anniversary concert..
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUvGbWqlBJE&feature=youtu.be

    peter yarrow was also at last fall’s people’s climate march, and was incredibly moved by the power of all those, marching for what they believe in, and for alternative energy.

    so while the hashtags bring even more people into the tent, the movement has a long history.

    i would also like to talk briefly about solar power, which i know a little about because i have a house powered by 40 solar panels. i’m a huge believer in solar, but i’m also hugely disappointed that it’s not more widely available to americans. i have reaped benefits of tax credits because of solar, but i have neighbors who don’t have the money to front for the installation of solar panels. yes, they can rent them, but buying a solar system for one’s home is by far the best and most economical way to do this. my proposal, which i have blogged about on my wabc tv Facebook page, is for the government to provide no-interest loans to homeowners who want to install solar systems but who don’t have the up-front capital to do that. they can, with the federal government’s support, pay back the installation costs through the electricity savings they enjoy every year.
    why this isn’t done is beyond me and any logic i can think of. well, except for the lobbying by the oil and gas industry, which doesn’t really have any interest in seeing solar – or any other alternative energy source – expand.

  7. bill ritter

    before the social media we know today was birthed, celebrities represented a kind of social media when it came to activism. and the environment has always been a front and center issue for them.
    I think go Woody Guthrie’s “This Land is My Land” because, really, wasn’t that an environmentalist tome? “This land is my land, this land is your land, from California to the New York Island. From the redwood forests, to the gulf stream waters, this land was made for you and me.” It was written in 1940, but not released until 1951.
    Later, entertainers who would become involved in the civil rights, anti-war, and women’s rights movements, also became involved in the environmentalist movement. Earth Day was one focus. Anti-nuclear protests were another, culminating in what was one of the most powerful environmentalist concerts ever – “No Nukes” in Sept. 1979 in New York City. It became an album and a movie.
    Here’s a link to some of the songs:
    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=no+nukes

    One of the anthems of that concert and the movement was “Power” by John Hall (later elected a Congressman from New York), with some powerful lyrics heralding the “warm power of the sun.”
    here are the lyrics:

    Just give me the warm power of the sun
    Give me the steady flow of a waterfall
    Give me the spirit of living things as they return to clay

    Just give me the restless power of the wind
    Give me the comforting glow of a wood fire
    But please take all of your atomic poison power away

    Everybody needs some power I’m told
    To shield them from the darkness and the cold
    Some may see a way to take control
    When it’s bought and sold

    I know that lives are at stake
    Yours and mine and our descendants in time
    There’s so much to gain, so much to lose
    Everyone of us has to choose

    Just give me the warm power of the sun
    Give me the steady flow of a waterfall
    Give me the spirit of living things as they return to clay

    Just give me the restless power of the wind
    Give me the comforting glow of a wood fire
    But please take all of your atomic poison power away

    here are peter paul and mary performing “power” in 1986 as part of PPM’s 25th anniversary concert..
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUvGbWqlBJE&feature=youtu.be

    peter yarrow was also at last fall’s people’s climate march, and was incredibly moved by the power of all those, marching for what they believe in, and for alternative energy.

    so while the hashtags bring even more people into the tent, the movement has a long history.

    i would also like to talk briefly about solar power, which i know a little about because i have a house powered by 40 solar panels. i’m a huge believer in solar, but i’m also hugely disappointed that it’s not more widely available to americans. i have reaped benefits of tax credits because of solar, but i have neighbors who don’t have the money to front for the installation of solar panels. yes, they can rent them, but buying a solar system for one’s home is by far the best and most economical way to do this. my proposal, which i have blogged about on my wabc tv Facebook page, is for the government to provide no-interest loans to homeowners who want to install solar systems but who don’t have the up-front capital to do that. they can, with the federal government’s support, pay back the installation costs through the electricity savings they enjoy every year.
    why this isn’t done is beyond me and any logic i can think of. well, except for the lobbying by the oil and gas industry, which doesn’t really have any interest in seeing solar – or any other alternative energy source – expand.

    • Sean Thompson

      I wanted to bring up a point of celebrities having a strong social activism presence before social media exploded on the scene. Celebrities such as Elton John, Bono, Mary J Blige, and Alicia Keys belonged to foundations that they felt were impactful and that energy isn’t seen now. It seems a bit contrived, and “forced” how all of a sudden people really care about causes, when there isn’t any follow-up activity to document these causes. I certainly don’t want to diminish goodwill as a press release (to promote a new venture or project) but the message does seem a bit confusing.

      • Kathleen Sweeney

        Really great to have this perspective on the 60s and 70s as a key time period for the social justice and environmental movements due in part to the evolution of Environmental Justice Law, modeled on Civil Rights Law (Brown v. Board of Education, etc.)! Obviously deep and lasting change comes in waves, and must be intergenerational. Millennials are after all the children of the Boomer generation who were teenagers and twenty-somethings during the Vietnam War protests and the emergence of the first environmental justice organizations and landmark legal cases. Organizations like the NRDC (National Resources Defense Council) were born out of an environmental law watershed case against ConEdison in 1965, which planned to build a huge power plant on top of Storm King mountain to meet energy needs. With a deck stacked against the plaintiffs who were few in number, “The decision was a legal landmark. For the first time, a conservation group had been permitted to sue to protect the public interest.” (http://www.nrdc.org/legislation/helaw.asp)
        Thanks for including John Hall’s lyrics. His election to the House of Representatives in the Hudson Valley from 2007 to 2011 marked a pivotal turning point in our local community in Cold Spring (where I lived at the time).
        What’s interesting is how much music, like Woody Guthrie’s classic “This Land is Your Land” fueled the first wave environmental and social justice movements. Pete Seeger, who passed away this past year at the venerable age of 94, often sang that anthem and was a tireless protector of the waterways and advocate for social justice. His environmental organization, Clearwater, continues on with educational programs from their headquarters on the Hudson River in Beacon, NY.

        • bill ritter

          peter seeger is the epitome of walking the walk. he, perhaps more than any other individual, set the high water mark (no pun intended) for helping to clean up the hudson. i was fortunate enough to interview him a couple of years ago, during a longer interview with woody guthrie’s son, Carlo.

          i’ve been thinking about other musicians who wove environmental themes into their songs – there are many. but, since i spent last week in the rockies, i was thinking of john denver, whose “rocky mountain high” included these words (when eagles were endangered):

          “Now his life is full of wonder
          But his heart still knows some fear
          Of a simple thing he cannot comprehend
          Why they try to tear the mountains down
          To bring in a couple more
          More people, more scars upon the land

          And the Colorado Rocky Mountain high
          I’ve seen it rainin’ fire in the sky
          He know he’d be a poorer man
          If he never saw an eagle fly
          Rocky Mountain high
          It’s the Colorado Rocky Mountain high……..”

          link:
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOB4VdlkzO4

          (PERSONAL SIDEBAR: I was not a john denver fan – thought he was far too into personal growth versus social activism, which was a big debate and source of conflict among friends in the late 60s and early/mid 70s. Then, when i was working for good morning america, we took the show on the road to aspen and, during a live performance as we staffers of GMA sat surrounding denver, he sang “rocky mountain high” with the rockies in the background, and i was converted. it was a moving experience.)

          AND THERE IS JONI MITCHELL’S “big yellow taxi” written in 1970 most certainly a sop to environmental awareness, with its paving paradise, putting up a parking lot and asking farmers to put away their ddt pesticides:

          “they paved paradise
          And put up a parking lot
          With a pink hotel, a boutique
          And a swinging hot spot

          Don’t it always seem to go
          That you don’t know what you’ve got
          Till it’s gone
          They paved paradise
          And put up a parking lot

          They took all the trees
          Put ’em in a tree museum
          And they charged the people
          A dollar and a half just to see ’em

          Don’t it always seem to go
          That you don’t know what you’ve got
          Till it’s gone
          They paved paradise
          And put up a parking lot

          Hey farmer farmer
          Put away that DDT now
          Give me spots on my apples
          But leave me the birds and the bees
          Please!

          Don’t it always seem to go
          That you don’t know what you’ve got
          Till it’s gone
          They paved paradise
          And put up a parking lot

          Late last night
          I heard the screen door slam
          And a big yellow taxi
          Took away my old man

          Don’t it always seem to go
          That you don’t know what you’ve got
          Till it’s gone
          They paved paradise
          And put up a parking lot

          They paved paradise
          And put up a parking lot”

          link:
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94bdMSCdw20

  8. Sara Maldonado

    I did not get to attend the People’s Climate March but did follow it via Twitter and Instagram. It was incredible to see the enthusiasm behind the movement. I really hope that it has helped lead to a tipping point in innovation. I had no idea that someone had invented solar panel roadways. The idea is AMAZING! Why has this not taken off? This needs to be an idea brought to Washington. Unfortunately, if the group behind this idea does not begin lobbying efforts, it may not go anywhere. To implement this on a massive scale, it needs to have some friends in DC to help push it along. Does anyone know how much money the Indiegogo was able to gather?

    • Kathleen Sweeney

      Check out the link above to learn more about the success of the Solar Roadways campaign. Through Indiegogo, they raised $2,216,089, after an initial $50,000 innovation grant from GE’s Ecomagination Challenge, by getting the most votes for “Powering the Grid” in 2010. The role of crowdfunding and crowd appeal has impacted their success along the way and has been crucial to the breakthrough attention.

      Due to the success of their innovative concept and its popular support, they were invited to the White House in June 2014 to participate in the first annual Maker’s Faire , and their project was mentioned in President Obama’s State of the Union Address in 2015! They were along honored as part of Popular Science magazine’s 100 Greatest Innovations of the Year 2014.

      Despite the naysayers, they continue to receive support and honors and will soon debut their first solar parking lot. By the way, a note about the skeptics, who are always there when breakthrough innovations emerge, never lose hope for your brilliant idea. They certainly didn’t. And they have been brilliant and tireless at responding to all questions with knowledge and grace and humor via Facebook and Twitter.

      • Denni Elias

        wow this sounds great! and the fact they are opening their first parking lot with the support of the President is proof of the power of this innovation.
        I’m already imagining how cool all the cities would look in this new technology and the reduction of energy waste! Just too good and encouraging for us to keep going.

  9. Sean Thompson

    That video changed my thought process, and 19 million people seem to agree with me. I’m surprised that this idea hasn’t been implemented yet. I know that influence goes a long way, and it will probably take a while before this concept catches the right ear. I think that when people realize how much money they will save on energy bills, and how they can use that money to make resources in their community available, this will win over a lot of people. I know that the oil and gas industries will try to make sure that this doesn’t see the light of day, and that saddens me. Greed, corrupt policies, and bonuses must mean more to people than making sure that future generations, future citizens of the world will have an inhabitable space to raise future generations of people.

  10. bill ritter

    meant to say that solar roadway video is just awesome. so logical. so much common sense. i’m going to post the link on my public Facebook page and see what the response is.. have to do it next week because, sadly, we are mourning a colleague – -a reporter who on thursday after a live shot was laughing in our news truck and suddenly turned to her photographer and said, “something”s wrong.” she grabbed her head. she never regained consciousness. lisa colagrossi was just 49, with two young boys. she died the next night. the photog rushed her to an ambulance that was on the street, buying her enough time for her family to say goodbye and for doctors to harvest her organs so other lives could be saved. we are simply crushed. i will post the solar roadway as a kind of circle of life statement – after she’s buried tomorrow.

  11. Kathleen

    So sorry to hear about the loss of your colleague …definitely will be thinking of you all. Sending good thoughts to her family and friends…

  12. Zoe Taraz

    I think we are at a unique point for the renewable energy movement. There is no doubt that these issues have become even more pushed into the limelight. I personally didn’t attend the Peoples Climate March but I had many friends that did. The energy, excitement, and promotion that occurred not just within our school, but also around the entire city was inspiring. It wasn’t just a march that could be type casted for environmentally inclined, “granola,” or “green” focused persons; it truly involved everyone regardless of their background or identity.

    I think we are at a point where people are starting to see the necessity of changing and altering our behaviors. There are big changes such as bans on fracking or relocation of funds that the articles speaks to but there are also smaller marketplace trends and activities that show this desire for change and evolvement. For example the popularity of the car manufacturer Tesla, and its resulting press, in addition to other retail and commerce trends, indicate a change in attitude. I also grew up in California and recycling is extremely accessible and absolutely ingrained within our behaviors. There are clear social pressures and responsibilities for individuals to participate in recycling. I am happy to start to see similar habits develop in New York City within recent years.

    In addition, retail chains such as Target and Stables were honored for having 261 and 201 Energy Star certified buildings. Industries who are active participants within the problem are working towards change. Also, the recent 12.3 million fine that Rite Aid received in relation to hazardous waste dumping shows that restrictions are being enforced.

    Ultimately I feel, with greater user engagement in relation to these issues, corporations will be forced to listen and change in order to maintain their own sustainability and survival.

  13. Jacqueline Buda

    Although I was unable to attend the march, I was very observant of how the city reacted to the event in the days before and after. This was a hugely publicized activity that impacted and inspired people all over the world. I saw subway posters advertising the march for at least a month before it happened.

    It was undeniably a major event, as this article states. As I have mentioned previously, I think that the most amazing thing about social media is that it can spread messages far and wide. Sometimes, this is negative. We now live in a world where cyber-bullying is a reality and hate can spread quickly. But just as quickly, a positive message can catch like wildfire, as it did with #HeforShe and #PeoplesClimateMarch.

    I think that people have now fully realized the need for environmental reform, however I am skeptical that real change will come quickly. When the Sandy Hook shooting occurred, everyone including President Obama got really fired up about change–maybe because the shooting happened in my hometown, I believed that this would really be the straw that broke the camel’s back. Unfortunately, there has been little change in that area and I’m worried this will be the same kind of story, at least for now. Luckily, there are so many people in the world (including my peers!) who feel so strongly for causes such as these. With the power of social media, ideas and bonds can be made faster so that united fronts can be formed. I think that social media will help expedite these processes and change CAN happen faster than ever.

    • bill ritter

      jacqueline… in the first two years right after the sandy hook gun massacre – thru dec 2014 – there were 95 shootings on k-12 and college campuses, or nearly 1 a week. so, you’re right… little has changed when it comes to real gun control. i think registration, etc… is great. but the only real change to gun violence will be outlawing guns… and ammo. short of that, i’m not sure how effective it really is in stopping gun violence.

  14. Denni Elias

    This is the first time I take a look at this video and its just amazing! I really enjoyed the concept and the engagement people all over the world are taking towards this common goal.
    I believe that indeed we are in the tipping point of change and I feel confident we are heading towards a more sustainable culture and community. From the introduction of the sharing economy concept (where companies like Uber or Alibaba are growing exponentially compared to traditional capitalist models) to the development of new technologies and consumption energy mechanisms, there is going on a change in people’s mentalities but this is still a minority and I feel there is a need to push forward every single day.

    Last term I had the joy of working on this project to create a new technological system to reduce waste and we came up with what we called “The EkoKiosk”

    This product was born from this idea of the way our society consume products and services nowadays but what happens with these products after they have served their purpose? How can we integrate this into a new product which eventually will help to innovate the way we consume and re-use energy.

    Using different technologies such as solar power energy or living wall plants, we created a machine which could eventually recycle waste and create a new product in that same moment. This is just a general idea, a beginning of new ways of thinking towards a more sustainable world. And as many innovators recall. We want to improve and not let the judgmental thinking stop us from moving forward. ”

    Denni Elias, “Journal entry 1?

    For images go to: https://beyondcelebrities.wordpress.com

    I would love to feel more engage in this type of events and now with the introduction of social media channels like Instagram or Snapchat, there is a chance for instant image and video where you get engaged for longer periods of time. An asset for spreading the word in a more meaningful way.


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